How To Achieve Zi Char-Level Fried Rice At Home

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How To Achieve Zi Char-Level Fried Rice At Home

STORY: Sim Ding En
07 August 2020

Fried rice is one of those things we all love to eat but are super sian at the thought of having to make it.

Well, in celebration of the National Day long weekend, MasterChef Singapore finalist Aaron Wong is here to debunk that myth - and help you celebrate not only the nation's 55th birthday, but also one of Singapore's most well-loved local dishes.

Yes, it's a bit involved, but all you need are a few ingredients (overnight rice is key), some focus and commitment, and an appetite (which true-blue Singaporean doesn't have that) - and you'll be on your way to having a zi char-level meal in your own home.

This video is part of "Aaron Wong's Stay-Home Survival Cookbook", our brand-new series offering food hacks, tips and tricks, and delicious, easy-to-make, survival-mode recipes to help you stay fed while you stay home and stay safe.

Fronted by the 42-year-old commercial photographer and avid diver, this useful and mouth-watering video series brings to life the series of the same name on Aaron's Instagram:

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Here’s part 2 of ‘Aaron’s Stay Home Survival Cookbook’. . Fried rice seems pretty straight forward right? No. Not when we are talking about those restaurant / Zichar level shit where each gain of rice is separated and coated with that orgasm inducing smoky flavor. Yap, that one. . Ok, the first enemy of any self respecting fried rice is moisture. So the myth of using overnight / left over rice is real. The idea is to let the moisture evaporate a little so make sure it’s not to tightly covered Separate two egg yolks and put them into 200g of overnight rice. Keep the whites for later. Add 1 tablespoon of fish sauce, 1 tablespoon of Lee Kim Kee minced garlic, 1 teaspoon of sugar some pepper, a dash of sesame oil and a tablespoon of cooking oil. Mix well making sure to break up and coat each grain of rice. Leave it aside. Add a dash of soya sauce, pepper and sesame oil to your egg white, and beat it up well. Heat up a non stick pan with some oil until it starts to smoke. Then throw your egg whites in for a very fast cook. That’s the trick to Chinese cooking, HOT, violent and fast! Most folks make the mistake of not having enough heat and cooking too long. So you have to make sure it is rocket hot. Don’t be afraid. Once cooked, remove, set aside, add more oil into pan and crank the heat back up. Throw in your rice and get violent with it. Toss it around as quickly as you so each grain cooks without sticking together. Make sure not to over burn it. It should take no more than a minute because remember, the rice IS really cook, you are just cooking the egg yolk that is coating them. Throw your cooked egg whites back in along with some chopped spring onion and or whatever proteins you have precooked and take it off the eat. DONE! . Again, this is not here to win an award. It’s comfort food anyone can do with the simplest ingredients we can find. We are talking about just rice and eggs, can’t get any more basic than that. As for the flavor, well, you can basically add whatever the hell you fancy. Sambal, Tom Yam, whatever. The technique is still the same. . As always, stay safe, wash your hands and no face touching. You know that.

A post shared by Aaron Wong | MasterChef SG (@aaronwong.sg) on

"Aaron Wong's Stay-Home Survival Cookbook" is also available on Wonderwall.sg's IGTV channel.

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TAGS: Aaron Wong's Stay-Home Survival Cookbook , Tips and Tricks
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