Here's What To Pack In Your Child's Lunchbox

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Here's What To Pack In Your Child's Lunchbox

STORY: Pearlyn Tham
05 October 2020

There are a few reasons why some parents would rather wake up earlier and prep snack or lunch boxes for their little ones. First, some kids may be too young to buy food at the canteen. Second, you may want your child to get used to eating healthily from a young age (though the last we heard, most school canteens no longer sell anything deep-fried or sweet!).

And then, there are the savvy children who would rather not waste precious minutes queuing up for food when they can easily nibble on what their parents packed from home and then have more time to play. Now, that’s what we call a smart kid!

1. Anything that doesn’t crumble

Unless you really enjoy dusting day-old cookie crumbs off your kiddo’s uniform, some OCD parents leave out crumbly biscuits and cookies from lunch boxes.

2. Anything without seeds

If you are packing fruit, anything seedless is a good idea. Even better, choose something that’s seedless and soft, which rules out many types of fruit except bananas, blueberries and strawberries.

3. Anything that can last in our weather

Either you send your kid off to school with an insulated bag lined with ice packs or you pick food that won’t spoil in our eternally 30 deg C climate. Some options include hard-boiled eggs, granola or cereals (without the milk, of course), soft buns and bread with jam or canned tuna (but no cream-based fillings or even greens that can wilt and turn soggy!). If you are packing drinks, UHT milk, soya milk, juices and good ol’ Milo are always a good idea as they do not have to be refrigerated.

4. Anything that won’t turn hard easily

Apart from food that can go soft and bad, there are those on the other end of the food spectrum – they simply turn hard and unappetising. Anything that is microwaved becomes rock solid if it’s not consumed immediately so if you are letting your little one bring lotus paste buns or chicken pies to school, always steam them instead.

5. Anything that isn’t hot

You may think that your six-year-old would appreciate some piping hot porridge at 10am but not only is that thermos pot heavy for her to cart around; it’s also a challenge for her to open the lid easily. And nobody really wants to wolf down scalding food during a 20-minute break. I mean, do you?

TAGS: Parenting